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DUST COLLECTOR
Intro
Assembly and Features
Importance of Efficient Dust Collection
Dust Collector Safety
Portable Use
Permanent Piping System
Cleaning the Filter Hood
Clearing the Air

Dust Collector
Click the following for a printer friendly version of Tip -
Pg. 1-4,
Pg. 5-8, Pg. 9-11

The Importance of Efficient Dust Collection

Uncontrolled sawdust can be both a nuisance and a hazard -- especially the potential health hazard of breathing sawdust. Because this involves even the most common woods, you should be particularly aware of woods that are known to be toxic.

For your safety, please refer to the list of toxic woods and the reactions they may cause (Table 25-1 below). Not everyone is sensitive to these woods, but you should still be very careful when working with them.

Table 25-1: Toxic Woods and Possible Reactions
Wood
Respiratory Ailments
Skin & Eye Allergies
Arborvitae
X
Ayan

X

Blackwood, African
X
Boxwood
X
X
Cashew
X
Cedar, Western Red
X
X
Cocobolo
X
Cocus
X
Dahoma
X
Ebony
X
X
Greenheart
X
X
Guarea
X
Ipe (lapacho)
X
X
Iroko
X
X
Katon
X
Mahogany, African
X
X
Mahogany, American
X
Makore
X
X
Mansonia
X
X
Obeche
X
X
Opepe
X
X
Peroba Rosa
X
X
Peroba, White
X
X
Ramin
X
Rosewood, Brazilian
X
Rosewood, East Indian
X
Satinwood, Ceylon
X
Satinwood, West Indian
X
Sequoia, Redwood
X
Sneezewood
X
Stavewood
X
Sucupira
X
Teak
X
Wenge
X
X
NOTE: This table has been reprinted from Fine Woodworking Magazine, copyright 1983. The taunton Press, Inc., 63 South Main Street, Box 355, Newtown, CT 06470.

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